2019 June Holiday Camps

Primary 3

Maths Camp (17-19 Jun, 9.30am-11.30am)

  • Master model drawing, develop mathematical reasoning and learn foolproof concepts that will save you time.

Creative Writing Camp (24-26 Jun, 9.30am-11.30am)

  • Become a better writer through experiential learning. Visit various places and translate the experience onto paper in the classroom.

 

Primary 4

Maths Camp (17-19 Jun, 9.30am-11.30am)

  • Solidify your understanding of foundational word problem topics and learn to apply critical concepts vital for your exams.

Creative Writing Camp (24-28 Jun, 9.30am-11.30am)

  • Hone your visualisation skills and descriptive writing skills through the use of various drama activities like role play.

 

Primary 5

Maths Camp (17-19 Jun, 9.30am-11.30am)

  • Excel in applying must-know concepts and in solving commonly-tested question types that many pupils struggle with.

Creative Writing Camp (24-28 Jun, 9.30am-11.30am)

  • With elements of peer presentation and peer teaching, learn from actual pupil writing samples to improve on content.

 

Primary 6

Maths Camp (17-21 Jun, 9.30am-11.30am)

  • Gain a competitive edge for the PSLE by mastering key Mathematical concepts and practicing with actual past PSLE questions.

Creative Writing Camp (24-28 Jun, 9.30am-11.30am)

  • Raise your content score by improving on story flow and logic. Analyse writing samples and learn to rectify content errors.

Paper 2 Camp (24-28 Jun, 12pm-2pm)

  • Gear up for the PSLE by focusing on Reading Comprehension, Editing, Cloze Passage and Synthesis & Transformation.

 

 

Spaces are limited, so call 6777 2468 or SIGN UP ONLINE today!

LiteracyPlus Tips: They’re / Their / There

 COMMON GRAMMATICAL MISTAKES #2: THEY’RE / THEIR / THERE

 

  • “They’re” is short for “they are”.

Incorrect: Their going to be home soon.

Correct:  They’re going to be home soon.

 

  • “Their” is the possessive form of “they” and indicates something belonging to someone.

Incorrect: Can we borrow they’re car?

Correct: Can we borrow their car?

Incorrect: We should contact there next-of-kin.

Correct: We should contact their next-of-kin.

 

  • “Thererefers to a particular place that is not where you are. We also use “there” to show something exists.

Incorrect: Jennifer’s horse is over their.

Correct: Jennifer’s horse is over there.

Incorrect: Their is a new shop next door.

Correct: There is a new shop next door.

 

LiteracyPlus Tips: Apostrophes

 COMMON GRAMMATICAL MISTAKES #1: MISPLACED APOSTROPHES

 

  • Apostrophes indicate possession – something belonging to something or someone. To indicate something belonging to one person, the apostrophe goes before the ‘s’.

Incorrect: Jennifers horse is over there.

Correct: Jennifer’s horse is over there.

 

  • To indicate something belonging to more than one person, put the apostrophe after the ‘s’.

Incorrect: The boys uniforms are ready for them to collect.

Correct: The boys’ uniforms are ready for them to collect.

Incorrect: The postman delivered the parcel to the Ng’s flat.

Correct: The postman delivered the parcel to the Ngs’ flat.

 

  • Apostrophes are never used to make a word plural, even when a word is in number form, as in a date.

Incorrect: We received a Chinese New Year card from the Lee’s.

Correct: We received a Chinese New Year card from the Lees.

Incorrect: My parents like to listen to music from the 1970’s.

Correct: My parents like to listen to music from the 1970s.

 

  • Apostrophes are also used to indicate a contraction.

Contractions are two words made shorter by placing an apostrophe where letters have been omitted. For example, “let’s” uses an apostrophe to indicate that the word is missing the “u” from “us”.

 

LiteracyPlus Tips: Prepositions

PREPOSITIONS

  • on OR in OR at?

A:  Listen – is this right: ‘I live on 99 Bishan Road’?

B:  No, that’s wrong! You live in 99 Bishan Road.

C:  Both wrong! You live at 99 Bishan Road.

Who is right? In is generally used when we talk about a location ‘inside’ something (in the house, in the theatre). On is used for a location ‘on top of’ something (on the table, on the floor), and at is used for a location which is a point on a horizontal or vertical surface (at the end of the drive, at the window). The problem is that there are different ways of looking at the same location.

But C is right.

At is used when street numbers are mentioned because we think of a particular point along the street, namely No. 99.

 

2018 Year-end Holiday Programmes

Our year-end holiday programme schedule is out! Check out the different holiday programmes we are running for N1 to P6 students by clicking the images below.

 

N1-K2 The Big Hungry Bear

This workshop for preschoolers is not to be missed. Centered around the famous children’s book The Little Mouse, The Red Ripe Strawberry, and The Big Hungry Bear, there will be storytelling, readers’ theatre, educational games, as well as a hands-on activity where children make their own Hungry Bear sandwich!

 

P1 Superheroes Writing Programme

Does your child have difficulty expressing himself/herself in writing? Taught in a safe and encouraging environment, pupils will learn how to write creatively ​on the theme​ of Superheroes. ​They will learn how to brainstorm descriptive words and phrases before putting their ideas into writing.  Using interactive activities such as storytelling, dramatisation ​and kinaesthetic games, pupils will have a chance to unleash their creative juices and expand their vocabulary.

 

P2 to P5 Holiday Camps

Looking to give your child a head start for next year? We are offering a variety of English and Maths programmes that you can choose to give your child practice in – creative writing, oral presentation, English paper 2 and Maths word problems.

 

P6 Intro to Sec 1 

How English is tested in secondary school is vastly different from primary school. This programme is designed to give your child a taste of what the secondary English papers are like, so that they start the school year with a clearer idea of what is expected of them.

A brief summary of the course contents is as follows:

  • Day 1: Editing & Situational Writing
  • Day 2: Continuous Writing
  • Day 3: Visual Text Comprehension
  • Day 4: Reading Comprehension & Summary Writing
  • Day 5: Listening Comprehension & Oral

 

Spaces are limited, so call 6777 2468 or SIGN UP ONLINE today!

Upcoming Parent Workshops

Ever wondered why your child is unable to apply the Maths concepts learnt to his/her exam paper? It is because not all students are able to bridge the gap between what is taught in schools and what is tested in the exams themselves. It is often higher-order, non-routine problem sums which students have difficulty with.

At this hands-on workshop, pick up tips and tricks and gain exposure to skills and strategies which you can immediately apply to help your child solve word problems.

 

Did you know that for secondary school Editing, unlike primary school where the errors are underlined, the errors are unmarked and students have to be able to find the errors themselves as well as identify two lines that are error free?

Did you know that secondary school Visual Text Comprehension questions test students’ critical thinking skills and their ability to evaluate the use of visuals and use of language for impact?

Get mentally prepared and find out exactly how different secondary English is from primary English by attending our workshop!

 

Join us at our hands-on Maths workshop to learn from our Head of Mathematics as she shares how model drawing can be effectively applied to make solving word problems easy. A visual means of helping young children “see” the word problem, model drawing can be a very useful tool when used the correct way.

 

Spaces are limited, so call 6777 2468 or SIGN UP ONLINE today!

LiteracyPlus Tips: English Paper 2 (Pri)

ENGLISH PAPER 2 (PRIMARY)

 

Primary 2

When writing your answer for MCQ Comprehension:

  • Circle the question numbers you’re unsure about. When you’re done with the whole paper, go back to the circled questions and cross out the wrong answers.

When writing your answer for Open-Ended Comprehension:

  • Grammar: Check that you have used the correct tense.
  • Punctuation: Make sure your sentences begin with a capital letter and end with a full stop. Remember to include quotation marks if you are asked for a specific word.
  • Spelling: Double-check the spelling of all key words in your answer against those in the passage because those key words are likely found there.

 

Primary 3 & 4

How to Figure Out the Meaning of New Words

Context clues are very useful when you are trying to figure out the meaning of words that are new to you. Usually, in a sentence, paragraph or text, there is at least one clue to the meaning of the word. An easy way to remember the types of clues would be S.E.A.: Synonym, Examples, Antonym.

  • Synonym: a word or phrase with the same meaning

Bamboos are not very nutritious, so the amount of bamboo pandas have to eat in 12 hours to stay healthy is up to 15 percent of their body weight.

  • Examples: a few examples of the word are given

Some catastrophes cause a huge volume of water to be shifted, such as earthquakes, landslides or volcanic eruptions.

  • Antonym: a word or phrase with the opposite meaning

It is always joyous when a cub is born, but devastating when one dies.

 

Primary 5

Synthesis & Transformation

  • Check that you did not omit or misspell any words.
  • Underline all key words that need to be changed. This is especially helpful when you’re changing the sentence from direct to indirect speech. Look out for Tenses, Pronouns and words related to Time and Place. For example:

Qn:     “I will investigate the cause of the blackout that happened in these areas yesterday,” he announced.

Ans:    The spokesman announced that he would investigate the cause of the blackout that had happened in those areas the previous day.

  • Learn to convert between nouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs. For example:

Qn:     The students apologised to the principal. They did so reluctantly.

Ans:    It was with reluctance that the students apologised to the principal.

LiteracyPlus Tips: English Paper 2 (Sec)

ENGLISH PAPER 2 (SECONDARY)

 

Summary writing is one of the most dreaded components of Paper 2. But it doesn’t always have to be that way! Use this 3-Step Strategy to guide you along.

 

Step 1: Identify the points

Before you start, mark out the paragraphs that you need to summarise (e.g. draw a line above and below these paragraphs).

  • Identify at least eight key points to summarise. Use dotted lines if you are unsure of your points and edits as you re-read and count the number of points you have chosen.
  • Every paragraph should contain at least one point.
  • Number your points
  • Underline only the key words, instead of underlining the whole sentence.

 

Step 2: Paraphrase the points

Understand each main point before rephrasing it. Be clear and concise!

  • Think of synonyms.
  • Eliminate phrasal verbs where possible (e.g. instead of “carry on”, use “continue”).
  • Eliminate “empty words”: redundant words without which the sentence is still grammatical (e.g. I think that the lecture was boring).
  • Change the sentence structure if necessary.

 

Step 3: Organise the points

Reorder the points in a logical way (e.g. compare-contrast / cause-effect / problem-solution).

  • Use connectors and transition words to signal the relationship between ideas. For example:
    • Compare-contrast: unlike, while, similarly, likewise
    • Cause-effect: since, as, thus, consequently
    • Additional related point: moreover, furthermore, additionally
  • Link related ideas together to further reduce the word count.

LiteracyPlus Tips: PSLE Reading Compre

PSLE READING COMPREHENSION

 

Learning how to paraphrase your answers is an important and required skill for the reading comprehension portion of the exam as marks get deducted whenever answers are lifted from the passage. Here are some tips on paraphrasing:

 

Tip #1

Select synonyms

Replace the key verbs, adjectives and adverbs with synonyms. You may need to use a phrase instead of a single word sometimes.

 

Tip #2

Mention the main idea

Focus on stating the main idea in your own words.

 

Tip #3

Structure it differently

Don’t let your Synthesis & Transformation skills go to waste! Use them to change the sentence structure (e.g. active to passive voice).

LiteracyPlus Tips: PSLE English Writing

PSLE ENGLISH WRITING

 

Tip #1

Gather story ideas from reading the news

Read the news daily for story ideas, or at least skim through the headlines. For example, the following news stories would be relevant content for a compo prompt on courage:

  • Students who helped boy trapped under car receives SCDF awards
  • SCDF officers to the rescue as flood waters rise
  • 78-year-old woman fights off armed robber at convenience store

 

Tip #2

Flesh out the climax

Make sure your climax is engaging and has sufficient detail.

Did you…

  • include your characters’ feelings, actions and thoughts?
  • use the five senses (beyond sight) to paint a vivid scene?
  • break down important actions into smaller steps?

Negative Example: The robber demanded for money.

Positive Example: One of the burly men fished a gun out of his baggy pockets and pointed it at the shopkeeper’s forehead. Advancing slowly towards the shaking shopkeeper, he roared, “Fill my bag up now!”

 

Tip #3

Use figurative language

Use the acronym MS HIP to help liven up your writing.

  • Metaphors:            The classroom became a zoo once Ms Lee left.
  • Similes:                   He avoided the water like the plague.
  • Hyperbole:             Old Mr Ong has been working here since the Stone Age.
  • Idioms:                    Our star player had fallen sick at the eleventh hour.
  • Personification:     Fear robbed me of my words.

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